Inventing= work with no pay

Inventing and creating is very stimulating to the mind.  You have to love it for that aspect because it really doesn’t pay.  The product that I am working on now is very simple for me to make by piecing together some other products.  It will be more of a challenge if I get to the point that I want them to be all one piece and machine made.  I will either have to search for manufacturing sources or try to get a big company to buy my idea.  Right now though I am working on the small part of it.

Yesterday I worked out how much they would cost in supplies, time to make them, and packaging.  You have to include packaging in your cost because packaging can get expensive.  I worked out that I can make 20 of these in 15 minutes, so that makes 80 in an hour.  I could pay someone to put them together for 15 cents each. 

So lets figure the cost of supplies is 25 cents, I will double that and charge 50 cents wholesale, and then double that again and charge $1.00 retail.  That is how most things work when it comes to pricing.  I think that electronics are different though. 

Most of the product that I made today will be given to students that I work with in the school district.  I am still working on seeing exactly how useful they are, how much the kids like them, and whether it will even be viable to sell them.  I’m not sure that it is even patentable.  I don’t know that at such a low cost, it would be worth the expense and effort to even start the patent process, and my product is so simple that I think a patent would be denied anyway.  They won’t issue a patent to something that is obvious.  Now while my product isn’t obvious to everyone, it could be considered obvious to other therapists.

If it was a different product, this is the time to do patent searches at http://www.uspto.gov.  You have to first research patents, because if there is already a patent out on your product, then it is not worth doing any work on it.  You will not be able to make any money on it, unless you are already a millionaire and you want to buy someone else’s patent.  I do not fall into that category.  My category is someone who will never see the money back that was spent on my last invention.  That is why I am very wary about how much money is spent.

I also have another route to go as a therapist.  Some of the big therapy product manufacturers will buy therapists’ ideas and manufacture them and put them in their catalogs.  I am not sure what route I will go.  I am just at the beginning stages.

Yesterday I spent much of the day working on packaging design in photoshop.  When I started my first invention, I didn’t know anything about photo editing and photoshop.  I just jumped in and learned it.  I have gotten pretty good at it.  I went through many stages yesterday.  I find that I have to make it in photoshop, print it out and see what I don’t like.  I changed things many times, and now have a good first package topper.  I will package my product in 4, 8, and 16 per package, and put them in a bag sealed with a heat sealer, and topped with a cardstock topper. 

A good way to figure out how your product should be packaged is to go to stores and look at how similar products are packaged.  You also need to look at the tags and product inserts to see what information needs to be on the packaging.  Another thing to do if you want your product to be in stores is to buy a bar code

**** I often will link to things on Amazon. These are usually affiliate links that will pay me a couple of dollars if you happen to buy something while there.